National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment |

National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment

Surveys

Listed here are the national surveys that gauge student outcomes and experiences, click on the titles to link to descriptions, related articles, and resources.

Student Surveys:

Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE)

Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)

Cooperative Institutional Research Program Freshman Survey (CIRP)

College Senior Survey (CSS)    

College Student Expectations Questionnaire (CSXQ)

College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ)

Global Perspective Inventory (GPI)
Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)
Student Experience in the Research University Survey (SERU)

Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)

The University Learning Outcome Assessment (UniLOA)

Your First College Year (YFCY)

Faculty Surveys:

Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE)

Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE)  

HERI Faculty Survey


Student Surveys:


Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE)


Description
The Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE) examines the high school academic and co-curricular experiences of entering college students. It is designed to be administered at the beginning of the fall semester, and can be used in conjunction with the NSSE at the end of the first year of college to provide information on college students’ engagement on campus.

Related Articles and Resources
*Cole, J.S., Kennedy, M., & Ben-Avie, M. (2009). The role of precollege data in assessing and understanding student engagement in college. New Directions for Institutional Research, 141, 55- 69.

This article demonstrates through case studies how precollege student data can help institutions understand the first-year experience.


 

Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)


Description

The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) works in partnership with NSSE, yet it is specifically designed to address the needs and context of community and technical colleges. Topics covered on the survey include, but are not limited to, how students spend their time, what they have gain from their experiences, how the college supports their learning, and how they assess their relationships with faculty, counselors, and peers. Institutions use results to benchmark with national norms, identify areas for improvement, and to monitor institutional effectiveness over time.

Related Articles and Resources
McClenney, K. M., & Marti, C. N. (2006). Exploring relationships between student engagement and student outcomes in community colleges: Report on validation research. Austin, TX: Community College Review Community College Survey of Student Engagement.

This research documents the validity of the CCSSE through case studies of Florida Community Colleges System, Achieving the Dream, and Hispanic Student Success Consortium Institutions.


Cooperative Institutional Research Program Freshman Survey (CIRP)


Description

The CIRP Freshman Survey is designed to provide comprehensive information on incoming first-year students at two and four year colleges and universities. It can be used by itself, or, when used in conjunction with the Your First College Year and the College Senior Survey, provides valuable baseline data this is essential for longitudinal assessment. The CIRP Freshman Survey can be used to examine readiness for college, how students choose college, student values and beliefs about diversity and civic engagement, and student expectations for involvement in college. Participating institutions receive a profile of their entering first-year class, as well as national normative data for students in similar types of institutions.

Related Articles and Resources

*Astin, A. W. (1998). The changing American college student: Thirty-year trends, 1966-1996. Review of Higher Education, 21, 115-135.

This article examines trends in student responses to the CIRP Freshman Survey over 30 years.

Pryor, J. H., Hurtado, S., DeAngelo, L., Palucki Blake, L., & Tran, S. (2009). The American freshman: National norms for fall 2009. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA.  

Report brief available here. This report summarized the findings of the 2009 CIRP Freshman Survey. The report covers topics including: financial concerns, political issues, personal and social responsibility, AP classes, special classes, and veterans.

Pryor, J. H., Hurtado, S. Saenz, V. B., Korn, J. S., Santos, J. L., & Korn, W. S. (2006). The American freshman: Forty year trends. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA.  

Research brief available here (along with a ppt presentation of findings). This report analyzes the CIRP survey from the past forty years.

Sax, L. J. (2009). Women graduates of single-sex and coeducational high schools: Differences in their characteristics and transition to college. Los Angeles: The Sudikoff Family Institute for Education & New Media, UCLA.

This commissioned report by the National Coalition of Girls' schools gives new data about single-sex education. Key findings were in the following topics: greater academic engagement, higher SAT scores, greater interest in graduate school, higher academic self-confidence, greater interest in engineering careers, stronger predisposition toward co-curricular engagement and greater political engagement.


College Senior Survey (CSS) 


Description

The College Senior Survey (CSS) is a comprehensive “exit” survey designed to collect information on students’ academic and campus life experiences, as well as students’ post-college plans.  The CSS focuses on academic achievement and involvement, cognitive and affective development, students’ values and goals, students’ satisfaction with their college experience, degree aspirations and career plans, and post-college plans.  Although the CSS can be used as a stand-alone instrument, when used in conjunction with the CIRP Freshman Survey or the Your First College Year Survey, the CSS generates valuable longitudinal data on students’ cognitive and affective growth during college. The institutional and comparative data for the CSS is used by institutions to understand the impact of institutional practices and policies on the growth and development of students.

Related Articles and Resources
Franke, R., Ruiz, S., Sharkness, J. DeAngelo, L. & Pryor, J. H. (2009). Findings from the 2008 administration of the College Senior Survey (CSS): National aggregates. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA. 

This report discusses overall trends found through this survey from the 2008 data.


College Student Expectations Questionnaire (CSXQ)


Description

The College Student Expectations Questionnaire (CSXQ), an adaptation of the CSEQ, assesses the goals and motivations of new students regarding how and with whom they will spend time in college. The CSXQ reports on student expectations regarding interactions with faculty, involvement with peers, nature of the campus learning environment, use of campus learning resources, and satisfaction with college. This information can be used to enhance programs and policies for first-year students. It can also be used as a pre-test, paired with the CSEQ at the end of the first-year to assess the degree to which student and institutional expectations have been met.


College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ)


Description

The College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) assesses students’ expended effort in using institutional resources and opportunities. The quality of this effort is related to student satisfaction, persistence, and the effects of attending college. Greater engagement in educational activities is expected to lead to greater benefits to student learning and development. The instrument is designed for purpose such as: determining program effectiveness, measuring learning outcomes, assessing academic year initiatives, compiling accreditation data, and assessing student involvement.

Related Articles and Resources

*Pace, C. R. (1984). Measuring the quality of college student experiences. An account of the development and use of the college student experiences questionnaire. Los Angeles, CA: Higher Education Research Institute, University of California. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED255099).

This report chronicles the development and use of the College Student Experiences Questionnaire.

*Pace, C. R. (1982). Achievement and the Quality of Student Effort. Los Angeles, CA: Higher Education Research Institute, University of California. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED227101).

This report uses CSEQ data (collected from 12,000 undergraduate students from 40 colleges over a period of three years) to examine the relationships between the quality of student effort and student achievement.

*Kuh, G. D. (1999). How are we doing? Tracking the quality of the undergraduate experience, 1960s to the present. Review of Higher Education, 22, 99-120.

This paper examines the quality of the undergraduate experience, drawing heavily from several decades of CSEQ data.


Global Perspective Inventory (GPI)


Description

Responding to the increasingly pluralistic society, the GPI is a survey specifically designed to provide self-reports of students' perspectives in three dimensions of global learning and development--cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal. The Cognitive domain consists of two scales: Knowing and Knowledge. The Intrapersonal domain consists of two scales: Identity and Affect. The Interpersonal domain consists of two scales: Social interactions and Social responsibility.

Related Articles and Resources
Braskamp, L. A. (2009). Internationalization in higher education: Four issues to consider. Journal of College & Character, 10(6), 1-7.

Braskamp argues that educators must consider ideas about internationalization as experiential learning.

Chickering, A. & Braskamp, L.A. (Winter 2009). Developing a global perspective for personal and social responsibility. Peer Review, 11(4), 27-30.

Drawing from the expertise of these two authors, this article looks at the role of a global perspective in student development. This article is available for purchase at the AAC&U website or through your institution's library.

NASFA, Association of International Educators. (2010). Assessment and evaluation for international educators. 2009 Teaching, learning, and scholarship knowledge community task force on assessment and evaluation.

"This document provides essential background and information to allow international educators to participate in assessment and evaluation, and it summarizes what is being done and by whom, identifying key resources and existing practices for international educators."

Sobania, N. & Braskamp, L.A. (Winter 2009). Study abroad or study away: It's not merely semantics. Peer Review, 11(4), 17-20.

In the same volume of Peer Review as the previous article, the authors in this article discuss how we need to think differently about studying abroad in an increasingly international world. Available online.


Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL)

Description

This is an annual survey of college students (104 institutions participated in Spring 2009) designed to assess leadership outcomes (measuring the social change model of leadership), leadership self-efficacy, and other outcomes along with an extensive set of environmental variables and pre-test measures. 

Related Articles and Resources
Dugan, J.P., Komives, S.R., & Owens, J.E. (2006, November). Multi-institution study of leadership. Presented at the International Leadership Association, Chicago, IL.

This powerpoint presentation describes the framework, methodology, and findings of MSL.

Dugan, J.P., Garland, J.L., Jacoby, B., & Gasiorski, A. (2008). Understanding commuter student self-efficacy for leadership: A with-in group analysis. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, 25(2).

Using the MSL survey, Dugan et al. (2008) examined the commuter student population and their leadership efficacy.


National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)


Description

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) examines how undergraduate students at four-year colleges and universities spend their time and what they gain from attending college. Several hundred colleges and universities participate each year in order to obtain information on student participation in the programs and activities that they provide. The data can be used to identify potential changes to policies and practices which may improve the student experience both inside and outside of the classroom.

Related Articles and Resources
Kuh, G.D. (2001). Assessing what really matters to student learning: Inside the National Survey of Student Engagement. Change, 33(3), 10-17, 66.

This article covers the history and current importance of NSSE. Access to article is through JSTOR, which may require login information.

Kuh, G.D. (2003). What we're learning about student engagement from NSSE. Change, 35(2), 24-32.

Kuh writes in this short article about lessons learned from NSSE about student engagement. Access to article is through JSTOR, which may require login information.

Gonyea, R.M. & Kuh, G.D. (2009). Using NSSE in institutional research. New Directions for Institutional Research, 141. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

This volume describes how NSSE is useful. Excerpt is available at the given link, the full article may also be purchased.

If interested, there are additional resources available on the NSSE resource page.


Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) Survey

Description
The SERU Survey, or the Student Experience in the Research University Survey, is a longitudinal survey specifically for research university that "provides important information about how students of diverse backgrounds and with varying economic pressures and competing obligations organize their time, define their academic purposes, respond to the curriculum and the extra-curricular opportunities for intellectual development, and make use of the resources of the institution." These results are then used for both institutional improvement and quality assurance within the university. The nine University of California campuses and some AAU institutions participate in this survey.

Related Articles and Resources

On the Center for Studies in Higher Education website, there are publications written from the SERU data. To access the publications, click here.


Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)      

Description

The Student Satisfaction Inventory (SII), administered by Noel-Levitz, is designed to examine student satisfaction and priorities on a wide variety of issues such as: academic advising, campus climate, campus support services, instructional effectiveness, safety and security, and student centeredness. Different versions of this survey are available based on institutional type (e.g., 4-year college/university, community/junior/technical college, 2-year career/private), as well as for special populations (e.g., adult learners, online learners). Results for individual campuses can be compared to national averages for benchmarking purposes.

Related Articles and Resources

Low, L. (2000). Are college students satisfied? A national analysis of changing expectations. Indianapolis, IN: USA Group Foundation. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED451816).

This report is the result of a national study of 745 college and universities. It examines student satisfaction data over a 4-year period from 1994-95 through 1997-98.


Bryant, J. L. (2006). Assessing expectations and perceptions of the campus experience: The Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory. New Directions for Community Colleges, 134, 25-35.

This article describes the content and implementation of the SSI, as well as its utility specifically for community colleges. Access to this issue is through Wiley Interscience and may require login.


Roszkowski, M. J., & Ricci, R. (2004-2005). Measurement of importance in a student satisfaction questionnaire: Comparison of the direct and indirect methods for establishing attribute importance. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 6, 251-271.

Members of a research- or measurement-minded audience may find this article interesting. The authors examine relationships between importance and satisfaction on dual-scale student satisfaction questionnaires (like the SII).



The University Learning Outcome Assessment (UniLOA)


Description

The University Learning Outcomes Assessment (UniLOA) is a standardized assessment instrument designed to measure student behaviors consistent with seven domains regarded as critical by employers, academicians, managers, researchers, accrediting agencies, and a host of others. These domains are: critical thinking, self-awareness, communications, diversity, citizenship, membership & leadership, and relationships. Through a variety of administration protocols, the UniLOA measures behavior at key points along a student’s academic lifespan, thus providing valuable data for college and university decision-makers to support strategic planning.

Related Articles and Resources

The Center for Learning Outcomes Assessment, Inc. (2011). University learning outcomes assessment (UniLOA): National report of means, 2009-2010.

This is the third annual report of UniLOA with updated mean scores of measured student behavior.

The Center for Learning Outcomes Assessment, Inc. (2010). University learning outcomes assessment (UNILOA): National report of means, 2008-2009. Retrieved from University Learning Outcomes Assessment website.

"This report presents mean scores for each of the UniLOA’s 70 items and its seven domains as well as a number of demographic-specific categories."


Your First College Year (YFCY)


Description

Developed through a collaboration between Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) and the Policy Center on the First Year of College at Brevard College, the Your First College Year (YFCY) enables institutions to identify features of the first year that encourage student learning, involvement, satisfaction, retention and success, thereby enhancing first-year programs and retention strategies at campuses across the country.  The YFCY collects information on a wide range of cognitive and affective measures such as: academic achievement and involvement, learning strategies, residential and employment experiences, interactions with peers, faculty and staff, values and goals satisfaction, self-confidence, and college adjustment.  Participating institutions receive institutional and comparative data which can be used for analyses of persistence, adjustment, and other first-year outcomes. Although the YFCY may be used as a stand-alone instrument, it was designed as a follow-up survey to the annual CIRP Freshman Survey and provides institutions with a method to examine longitudinal changes in student behavior, beliefs, and identity over the first year in college.

Related Articles and Resources

Higher Education Research Institute. (2011). Findings from the 2009 administration of the Your First College Year (YFCY): National aggregates. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Insititue, UCLA.

This report summarized general findings from the 2010 YFCY.

*Hurtado, S., Eagan, M. K., Cabrera, N.L., Lin, M.H., Park, J., & Lopez, M. (2008). Training future scientists: Predicting first-year minority student participation in health science research. Research in Higher Education, 49 (2), 126-152.

This article uses both CIRP and YRFY information to determine first year participation in health science majors. Access to this article is through SpringerLink and may require login.

Liu, A., Sharkness, J., & Pryor, J. H. (2008). Findings from the 2007 administration of Your First College Year (YFCY): National aggregates. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA.

This document provides a historical overview of the YFCY survey, information on the administration of the survey, and numerous results from the 2007 national survey.

Pryor, J. H., Hurtado, S., DeAngelo, L., Palucki Blake, L., & Tran, S. (2010). Your first college year: National Norms for the 2009 YFCY survey. Los Angeles:  Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA. 

This research brief describes the national norms for the incoming American freshman for the fall of 2009.

Ruiz, S., Sharkness, J. Kelly, K. R., DeAngelo, L., & Pryor, J. H. (2009). Findings from the 2009 administration of the Your First College Year (YFCY): National aggregates. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA. 

This report summarizes general findings from the 2009 YFCY.

 

Faculty Surveys:


Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE)


Description

The Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE) is designed as a companion survey to CCSSE, in order to gather faculty members’ perspectives regarding students’ educational experiences, their teaching practices, and the ways that they spend their professional time inside and outside of the classroom. This report may be compared to the CCSSE report for student-faculty comparisons. In addition, it can be used to spark campus-wide conversation about strategies for improving student engagement and success.


 

Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE)  


Description

The Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE) is a complimentary resource to NSSE which focuses on faculty perceptions of student engage in programs and activities on campus. Topics addressed include faculty’s perception of importance of various areas of learning and development, the nature and frequency of faculty-student interactions, and the strategy that faculty use to organize their own time inside and outside of the classroom. The data may be used for faculty development workshops and retreats, curricular reform, and accreditation or self-studies.

Related Articles and Resources
Kuh, G.D., Chen, D.P., & Nelson Laird, T.F. (2007). Why teacher-scholars matter: Some insights from FSSE and NSSE. Liberal Education, 93(4), 40-45.

With a desire for students to innovate and inquire, teacher-scholars are increasingly important, follow this discussion by reading this article.


HERI Faculty Survey


Description

The HERI Faculty Survey profiles the attitudes, experiences, concerns, job satisfaction, workload, teaching practices, and professional activities of collegiate faculty and administrators.   The HERI Faculty Survey can be used to provide faculty perspective on issues covered in the CIRP Surveys.   Participating institutions receive a detailed profile of their faculty, as well as national normative data for faculty in similar types of institutions. These reports, together with the national normative profile, provide important information that institutions use for a variety of program and policy areas, including self study and accreditation activities, campus planning and policy analysis, and faculty development and programming.

Related Articles and Resources
DeAngelo, L., Hurtado, S. Pryor, J. H., Kelly, K. R., Santos, J. L., & Korn, W. S. (2009). The American college teacher: National norms for the 2007-2008 HERI Faculty Survey. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA. 

This brief looks at the data collected from the HERI faculty survey data from 2007-2008 and picks out general themes including: goals for undergraduate education, student-centered pedagogy, engaged scholarship, views on diversity, and female professors.

Hurtado, S., & DeAngelo, L. (2009). Keeping senior women at your college. Academe, 95 (5), 18-20. 

"This nationwide study points to the role of the dean and department chair in supporting women in the higher ranks."

Hurtado, S. & Sharkness, J. (2008). Scholarship is changing, and so must tenure review. Academe, 94(5), 37-39.  

"To gain the freedom to innovate, we must get tenure; yet to get tenure, we must be conformists."

Levine, A. (1997). How the academic profession is changing. Daedalus, 126, 1-20.

This article explores forces that are changing the academic profession across various higher education sectors. Evidence is presented from the 1995-1996 HERI Faculty Survey, as well as other sources.

*Lindholm, J.A., Szelenyi, K. (2008). Faculty time stress: Correlatees within and across academic disciplines. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 17(1-2), 19-40.

"This study examined the determinants of time stress among a national sample of faculty." Access to this article is through the Taylor & Francis Group, and may require a login.

*Due to copyright regulations we cannot put up direct links to many of these articles, but they are available through many university libraries.


 

"For several months I struggled to teach myself about learning outcomes and assessment in higher education. And then in October 2009 I found NILOA. In one place, I found current information and plenty of helpful resources. Its national survey results provide a big picture, the occasional papers provide thoughtful commentary and analysis, and the tool kit gave me excellent descriptive information on assessment measures and links to longer documents. All this was extremely helpful to me and easy to use."

Patricia Crosson
Senior Adviser for Academic Policy
Department of Higher Education
Commonwealth of Massachusetts