National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment |

National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment

Papers, Articles, & Presentations

In this section, we will provide a bibliography of Papers, Articles, & Presentations on student learning outcomes assessment. The resources are organized by topic to make them more accessible. Due to copyright regulations we cannot put up direct links to many of these articles, but they are available through many university libraries. You may also access the complete resource list here.

Inside this section


Accountability

Association of American Colleges and Universities (2008). Our students' best work: A framework for accountability worthy of our mission (2nd Ed.). Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. http://www.aacu.org/publications/pdfs/StudentsBestreport.pdf

This document "framed and approved by the AAC&U Board of Directors, is designed to help campuses respond to calls for greater accountability in ways that strengthen as well as document the quality of student learning in college." (p. iii)

Eubanks, D. (2006). The problem with standardized assessment: There are other, better ways than high-stakes testing to hold institutions accountable for making good on the promises of higher education. Retrieved November 5, 2007, from http://snipurl.com/1te81

This brief article offers recommendations for other assessments besides that of standardized assessment currrently going on in today's higher education institutions.

National Commission on the Future of Higher Education. (2006). A test of leadership: Charting the future of U.S. higher education. Washington, DC: US Department of Education. http://www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/pre-pub-report.pdf

This report looks at the future of higher education and the issues of: value, access, cost and affordability, financial aid, learning, transparency and accountability, and innovation.

State Higher Education Executive Officers. (2005). Accountability for better results: A national imperative for higher education. Denver, CO: Author. http://www.sheeo.org/account/accountability.pdf

This report examined the current accountability structure in higher education and offered recommendations to improve its system.


Assessment Tools:
VALUE, Greater Expectations, Rising to the Challenge, VSA, Texas Experience, Transparency by Design

Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2007). Rising to the challenge: Meaningful assessment of student learning (Project Overview). Retrieved November 7, 2007, from http://snipurl.com/1te7u

This article provides an overview of VALUE, or Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education, "a national project to advance our understanding around assessment student learning outcomes."

Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2002). Greater expectations: A new vision for learning as the nation goes to college. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from: http://www.aacu.org/gex/index.cfm.

This article provides an overview of the Greater Expectations Initiative, conducted by AAC&U from 2000-2006 which "articulated the aims and purposes of a twenty-first century liberal education and identified innovative models that improve campus practices and learning for all undergraduate students, and advocated for a comprehensive approach to reform." The results of this project helped to formulate AAC&U's current LEAP initiative.

Banta, T. W., & Associates. (2002). Building a scholarship of assessment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

"In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice."

Borden, V. M. H., & Pike, G. R. (Eds.) (2009). Assessing and accounting for student learning:

Beyond the Spellings Commission. New Directions for Institutional Research Assessment Supplement 2007. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

This volume covers the background and context of assessment accountability, VSA, Texas Experience, VALUE, and Rising to the Challenge.

Hardison, C. M., & Vilamovska, A. (2009). The collegiate learning assessment: Setting         standards for performance at a college or university.  Santa Monica, CA: Rand.

http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/TR663/

"This report illustrates how institutions can set their own standards on the CLA using a method that is appropriate for the CLA's unique characteristics. The authors examined evidence of reliability and procedural validity of a standard-setting methodology that they developed and applied to the CLA."

Maeroff, G. I. (2006). Beyond the rankings: Measuring learning in higher education. An overview for journalist and educators. The Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media. New York , NY: Teachers College at Columbia University.

McPherson, P., & Shulenburger, D. (2006, August). Toward a public universities andcolleges Voluntary System of Accountability for undergraduate education (VSA): ANASULGC and AASCU discussion draft. Washington, DC: NASULGC. http://www.voluntarysystem.org/docs/background/DiscussionPaper3_Aug06.pdf

This article talks about the VSA and how institutions can use this self-evaluation.

Mislevy, R. J., Almond, R. G., & Lukas, J. F. (2003). A brief introduction to evidence-centered design. CSE Technical Report ETS Research Rep. No.RR-03-16. Los Angeles, CA: THe National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, Student Testing (CRESST), Center for Studies in Education, UCLA. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from http://www.education.umd.edu/EDMS/mislevy/papers/BriefIntroECD.pdf

One approach to assesssment is evidence-centered assessment design (ECD). This report describes the basics of ECD and presents information on a framework and possibly delivery systems using ECD.

New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability. (2012). Committing to Quality: Guidelines for Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education.

Through its publication, Committing to Quality: Guidelines for Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education, the Alliance guides colleges and universities in improving the quality of a college degree. It asks colleges to take responsibility for assessing and improving student learning — to set clear goals for student achievement, regularly gather and use evidence that measures performance against those goals, report evidence of student learning, and continuously work to improve results.

Peterson, M. W., & Einarson, M. K. (2001). What are colleges doing about student assessment? The Journal of Higher Education, 72(6), 629-669.

"The purpose of our study was to extend current understanding of how postsecondary institutions have approached, supported, and promoted undergraduate student assessment, and the institutional uses and impacts that have been realized from these assessment efforts" (p.630). The article may be accessed through JSTOR upon login.

Presidents' Forum of Excelsior College. (2007). Transparency by design: Principles of good practice for higher education institutions serving adults at a distance. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from http://www.wcet.wiche.edu/wcet/docs/tbd/TbD_PrinciplesofGoodPractice.pdf

The Principles of Good Practice for Higher Education Institutions Serving Adults at a Distance, developed by the Presidents' Forum were "developed to ensure that higher education courses and programs for adults learning at a distance are of high quality and readily accessible." The 15 Principles "define parameters of excellence; promote transparency of higher education institutions delivering distance learning programs; and foster dialogue to strengthen and improve the quality of programs and services."

Rhodes, T. L. (Ed.). (2010). Assessing outcomes and improving achievement: Tips and tools for using rubrics. AAC&U. Retreived from here.

"This publication provides practical advice on the development and effective use of rubrics to evaluate college student achievement at various levels. Also included are the rubrics developed by faculty teams for fifteen liberal learning outcomes through AAC&U's Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) project."

Snider-Lotz, T. G. (2002). Designing an evidence-centered assessment program. Atlanta, GA: Qwiz, Inc.

Shulman, L. S. (2007). Counting and recounting: Assessment and the quest for accountability. Change, 39(1), 20-25.

Sulman questions how assessments are presented. "How and what we choose to count and the manner in which we array and display our accounts is a form of narrative—legitimately, necessarily, and inevitably" (p.20).


Campus Support

Association of American Colleges and Universities (2008). Our students' best work: A framework for accountability worthy of our mission (2nd Ed.). Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. http://www.aacu.org/publications/pdfs/StudentsBestreport.pdf

This document "framed and approved by the AAC&U Board of Directors, is designed to help campuses respond to calls for greater accountability in ways that strengthen as well as document the quality of student learning in college." (p. iii)

Peterson, M. W., & Einarson, M. K. (2001). What are colleges doing about student assessment? The Journal of Higher Education, 72(6), 629-669.

"The purpose of our study was to extend current understanding of how postsecondary institutions have approached, supported, and promoted undergraduate student assessment, and the institutional uses and impacts that have been realized from these assessment efforts" (p.630). The article may be accessed through JSTOR upon login.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making."


Classroom Assessment

Baron, M. A., & Boschee, F. (1995). Authentic assessment: The key to unlocking student success. Retrieved from: http://books.google.com/books/about/Authentic_assessment.html?id=olJsQgAACAAJ

"A review of authentic assessment that provides, in addition to a thorough grounding in the topic area, insightful thoughts on the purposes of evaluation, the nature of school planning, and the current status of efforts at school reform."

Diamond, R. M. (2008). Designing and assessing courses and curricula: A practical guide. (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

This updated book provides readers with tools and examples for those interested in adopting a learner-centered approach in their courses.


ePortfolios

Banta, T. W. (Ed.) (1999). Portfolio assessment: Uses, cases, scoring, and impact. Jossey-Bass: San Francisco.

"This booklet's articles explore how portfolios, including Web-based portfolios, have been used at various institutions to assess and improve programs in general education, the major, advising, and overall institutional effectiveness. They describe ways portfolios can be scored, students' perspectives on portfolios, how portfolios changed the faculty culture at one college, and more."

Banta, T. W., & Associates. (2002). Building a scholarship of assessment. San Francisco:

Jossey-Bass.

"In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice."

Cambridge, B., Cambridge, D., & Yancey, K. B. (Eds). (2009). Electronic portfolios 2.0:

Emergent research on implementation and impact. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing

This book features emergent results of studies from 20 institutions that have examined effects on student reflection, integrative learning, establishing identity, organizational learning, and designs for learning supported by technology.

Chen, H. L., & Light, T. P. (2010). Electronic portfolios and student success: Effectiveness, efficiency, and learning. AAC&U Publications.

This publication presents an overview of electronic portfolios and ways individuals and campuses can implement e-portfolios to enhance and assess student learning, recognizing that learning occurs in many places, takes many forms, and is exhibited through many modes of representation. This work is illustrated through multiple campus case study examples. Available for purchase at the AAC&U website.


Exemplar Examples of Assessment

Banta, T. W. (Ed.) (2004). Hallmarks of effective outcomes assessment. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley.

"This booklet brings together the best guidance and practices from Assessment Update to illustrate time-tested principles for all aspects of assessment from planning and implementing to sustaining and improving assessment efforts over time. Useful for those new to assessment as well as experienced practitioners, it details the specific hallmarks required for the success of any assessment program--from leadership and staff development to the assessment of process as well as outcomes, ongoing communication among constituents, and more."

Banta, T.W. (2005). What draw campus leaders to embrace outcomes assessment?
Assessment Update, 17(5), 3,14-15.

This editor's note beings with the question, "What can we learn from the leaders of institutions note for outstanding work in outcomes assessment?" which the author asked eleven top administrators (p.3). This article summarize her findings.

Bollag, B. (2006). Making an art form of assessment. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 53(10), A8- A10. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from MasterFILE Premier database http://snipurl.com/1uwvq

This article discusses Alverno College, a leader in assessment in higher education.

Dunn, D. S., McCarthy, M. A., Baker, S., & Halonen, J. S. (2011). Using quality benchmarks for assessing and developing undergraduate programs. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

In an effort to "identify a model for undergraduate program review," Peggy Maki's foreword indicates that the four authors - Dunn, McCarthy, Baker, and Halonen – review "eight domains that define quality undergraduate academic program and departments in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences: program climate; assessment, accountability, and accreditation issues; student learning outcomes; student development; curriculum; faculty characteristics; program resources; and administrative support" (p. ix). The authors "suggest using these selected quality benchmarks to assist undergraduate programs in establishing quality objectives, monitoring progress toward their achievement, and ultimately achieving a level commensurate with department talent, energy, and resources" (p. 4).

Maki, P. (2010). Coming to terms with student outcomes assessment: Faculty and administrators' journeys to integrating assessment in their work and institutional culture. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Written in the first-person singular and plural by faculty and administrators who have served daily on the front lines of their institutions' efforts to integrate assessment into institutional life this book consists of 14 essays describing institutions' and programs' journeys, including the ins and outs, ups and downs, and periods of ebb and flow that characterized day-to-day, month-to-month, and year-to-year developments. Integrated into each essay are writers' observations, the lessons they learned, and their reflections on their institutions' or programs' journeys, as well as their personal journeys, which often led them to revise their own thinking about how to design and implement an effective and useful assesment process. (p. 1-2)

Maki, P. (2004). Assessing for learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

"This book offers colleges and universities a framework and tools to design an effective and collaborative assessment process appropriate for their culture and institution. It encapsulates the approach that Peggy Maki has developed and refined through the hundreds of successful workshops she has presented nationally and internationally."


Exemplar Examples of Learning Outcomes

Association of American Colleges and Universities (2008). Our students' best work: A framework for accountability worthy of our mission (2nd Ed.). Washington DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. http://www.aacu.org/publications/pdfs/StudentsBestreport.pdf

This document "framed and approved by the AAC&U Board of Directors, is designed to help campuses respond to calls for greater accountability in ways that strengthen as well as document the quality of student learning in college." (p. iii)

Brownell, J. E., & Swaner, L. E. (2010). Five high-impact practices: Research on learning outcomes, completion, and quality. Washington DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

"This monograph examines what educational research reveals about five educational practices: first-year seminars, learning communities, service learning, undergraduate research, and capstone experiences." You may purchase this item through the AAC&U website.

Garcia, A. E., & Pacheco, J. M. (1992, March). A student outcomes model for community colleges: Measuring institutional effectiveness. Paper presented at the 1992 North Central Association of Colleges and Schools commission. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from the ERIC database, from http://snipurl.com/1te88

"In 1986, Santa Fe Community College (SFCC), in New Mexico, developed the Student Outcomes Model (SOM), an approach to student outcomes assessment which focuses on institutional mission, the college's diverse clientele, and the varied enrollment goals of its students. Through a series of ongoing outcomes studies, the SOM seeks to: identify what the college should be teaching, measure the extent to which the college is actually doing so, and collect information to help the college better fulfill its mission."

Miller, R. (2007). Assessment in cycles of improvement: Faculty designs for essential learning outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities

This publication features a series of reports on how selected colleges and universities foster and assess student learning in twelve liberal education outcome areas, including writing, quantitative literacy, critical thinking, ethics, intercultural knowledge, and information literacy. Moving from goals to experiences, assessments, and improvements driven by assessment data, each institutional story illustrates how complex learning can be shaped over time and across programs to bring students to higher levels of achievement of these important outcomes.


General Education Assessment

Banta, T. W. (Ed.) (1999). Portfolio assessment: Uses, cases, scoring, and impact. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This booklet's articles explore how portfolios, including Web-based portfolios, have been used at various institutions to assess and improve programs in general education, the majory, advising, and overall institutional effectiveness. They describe ways portfolios can be scored, students' perspectives on portfolios, how portfolios changed the faculty culture at one college, and more."

Seybert, J. A. (2002). Assessing student learning outcomes. New Directions for Community

Colleges, 117.  San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This chapter addresses assessment of student learning in general education, transfer programs, career and occupational programs, remedial and developmental courses and programs, and noncredit and continuing education offerings, as well as assessment of affective and noncognitive outcomes and the use of assessment results." The article is available at Wiley InterScience upon login.


Organizational Assessment

Miller, B. A. (2007). Organizational performance in higher education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

This book provides an overview of assessment approaches in higher education to help define and measure organizational performance.


 

Planning Assessment

Association of American Colleges and Universities (2008). Our students' best work: A framework for accountability worthy of our mission (2nd Ed.). Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. http://www.aacu.org/publications/pdfs/StudentsBestreport.pdf

This document "framed and approved by the AAC&U Board of Directors, is designed to help campuses respond to calls for greater accountability in ways that strengthen as well as document the quality of student learning in college." (p. iii)

Ewell, P. T. (2008).  US accreditation and the future of quality assurance: A tenth

anniversary report from the Council on Higher Education Accreditation. Washington, DC: CHEA Institute for Research and Study of Accreditation and Quality Assurance.

"This book provides a comprehensive review of the current role of accreditation in the United States and considers its future. The principal audiences for which it was prepared are policy leaders at institutions, higher education associations, accrediting organizations and government agencies."

Hatfield, S. (2009). Assessing Your Program-Level Assessment Plan. (IDEA Paper No. 45). Manhattan, KS: The IDEA Center.

This paper helps institutions understand how to assess their program-level assessment plans.

Kramer, G. L., & Swing, R. L. (Eds). (2010). Higher Education assessments: Leadership matters. Lanham,MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

"This book reflects the work of a select group of researchers, scholars, and practitioners in higher education assessment with the goal of identifying strategies that assist senior campus leaders as they respond to the challenges of a changing economic landscape and political climate."

Shulman, L. S. (2007). Counting and recounting: Assessment and the quest for

accountability. Change, 39(1), 20-25.

Sulman questions how assessments are presented. "How and what we choose to count and the manner in which we array and display our accounts is a form of narrative—legitimately, necessarily, and inevitably" (p.20).

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making."

Terenzini, P. T. (1989). Assessment with open eyes: Pitfalls in studying student outcomes.

Journal of Higher Education, 60, 644-664.

"This article calls attention to some of those pitfalls [of assessment] and suggests, however briefly, how at least some of them might be avoided" (p. 646). The paper has a twofold purpose, "first, to identity some of the serious conceptual, measurement, organizational, and political problems likely to be encountered in the process of designing and implementing an assessment program; and second, by identifying some of the pitfalls, to help people who are involved in assessment to "do" it well" (p. 646). This article is available through JSTOR upon login.


Principles of Assessment

American Association of Higher Education. (1997). Principles of Good Practice for Assessing Student Learning. Exxon Education Foundation. Retrieved from: http://condor.depaul.edu/acafflpc/aahe.htm

The authors of the Principles provide a set of guidelines for effective assessment practice.

Banta, T. W., Jones, E. A., & Black, K. E. (2009). Designing effective assessment: Principles and profiles of good practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Over 146 higher education institutions were profiled in order to identify the 13 most essential principles for good practice in assessing student learning outcomes. Three phases of assessment - planning, implementing, and improving and sustaining assessment on campus - are of focus.

American Association of Higher Education

New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability. (2012). Committing to Quality: Guidelines for Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education.

Through its publication, Committing to Quality: Guidelines for Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education, the Alliance guides colleges and universities in improving the quality of a college degree. It asks colleges to take responsibility for assessing and improving student learning — to set clear goals for student achievement, regularly gather and use evidence that measures performance against those goals, report evidence of student learning, and continuously work to improve results.


Student Affairs

Bresciani, M. J. (2003). External partners in assessment of student development and learning in Student Affairs and external relations. New Directions in Student Services, 97. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This chapter discusses the role of external partnerships in student development and learning outcomes assessment in the context of results from a national survey of senior student affairs officers." The article is available at Wiley InterScience upon login.

Bresciani, M. J. (2006). Outcomes-based academic and co-curricular program review: A compilation of institutional good practices. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Surveying over forty institutions, this book highlights good practices of outcomes-based assessment program review.

Bresciani, M.J., Zelna, C.L., & Anderson, J.A. (2004). Assessing student learning and development: A handbook for practitioners. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

This handbook argues the importance of student learning assessment and gives the reader a toolbox of techniques and examples for student learning and development assessment. Available on the NASPA website for purchase.

Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., & Whitt, E. J. (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"Student Success in College describes policies, programs, and practices that a diverse set of institutions have used to enhance student achievement. This book clearly shows the benefits of student learning and educational effectiveness that can be realized when these conditions are present. This book provides concrete examples from twenty institutions that other colleges and universities can learn from and adapt to help create a success-oriented campus culture and learning environment."

Kuh, G. D., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E. J., & Associates. (1991). Involving colleges: Successful approaches to fostering student learning and development outside the classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"Involving Colleges details the extracurricular environments of fourteen diverse involving colleges and universities and shows how and where successful conditions and characteristics can be adapted to institutions to complement the institution's unique educational purpose and mission."

Manning, K., Kinzie, J., & Schuh, J. (Eds). (2006). One size does not fit all: Traditional and innovative models of student affairs practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

"In this book, leading scholars advocate a new approach by presenting thirteen possible models of student affairs practice. These models are based on a qualitative, multi-institutional case study research project involving 20 institutions of higher education varying by type, size and mission."

Schuh, J. H., Upcraft, M. L., & Associates (1996). Assessment in student affairs: A guide for practitioners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

This is a "single-volume, practical resource on using assessment to develop and improve all facets of student affairs. It includes detailed guidance for student affairs staff on how to assess student needs, student satisfaction, campus environments, campus cultures, and student outcomes. And it explains how senior staff can employ assessment findings in strategic planning, policy development, and day-to-day decision making."

Schuh, J. H., Upcraft, M. L., & Associates (2001). Assessment practice in student affairs: An applications manual. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

An companion to the 1996 release, "this manual continues the work begun in their earlier book and provides a full range of tools for conducting effective assessments. The authors begin with an overview of the assessment process and then detail a range of methodologies, approaches, and issues--explaining how to use them and when to recruit expertise from other campus sources."


Transparency

Allen, J., & Bresciani, M. J. (2003, January). Public institutions public challenges. Change: The magazine of higher learning (35)1.

A discussion about the use of assessments and reports in transparent communication. Available from heldref publications upon login.

McPherson, P., & Shulenburger, D. (2006, August). Toward a public universities and

colleges Voluntary System of Accountability for undergraduate education (VSA): A NASULGC and AASCU discussion draft. Washington, DC: NASULGC. http://www.voluntarysystem.org/docs/background/DiscussionPaper3_Aug06.pdf

This article talks about the VSA and how institutions can use this self-evaluation.

Miller, R. (2007). Assessment in cycles of improvement: Faculty designs for essential learning outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

This publication features a series of reports on how selected colleges and universities foster and assess student learning in twelve liberal education outcome areas, including writing, quantitative literacy, critical thinking, ethics, intercultural knowledge, and information literacy. Moving from goals to experiences, assessments, and improvements driven by assessment data, each institutional story illustrates how complex learning can be shaped over time and across programs to bring students to higher levels of achievement of these important outcomes.

National Commission on the Future of Higher Education (2006). A test of leadership:

Charting the future of U.S. Higher Education. Washington, DC: US Department of Education. http://www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/pre-pub-report.pdf

This report looks at the future of higher education and the issues of: value, access, cost and affordability, financial aid, learning, transparency and accountability, and innovation.


Understanding Assessment (Definition and History)

Banta, T. W., & Associates. (2002). Building a scholarship of assessment. San Francisco:

Jossey-Bass.

"In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice."

Borden, V .M. H., & Pike, G. R. (Eds.) (2009). Assessing and accounting for student learning: Beyond the Spellings Commission. New Directions for Institutional Research Assessment Supplement 2007. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

This volume covers the background and context of assessment accountability, VSA, Texas Experience, VALUE, and Rising to the Challenge.

Kuh, G. D., & Ewell, P. T. (2010). The State of learning outcomes assessment in the United States. Higher Education Management and Policy, 22 (1), OECD, 1-20.

"This paper summarises the status of undergraduate student learning outcomes assessment at accredited colleges and universities in the United States" (p.1). You may view this article upon login at OECD.

Ewell, P. T. (2002). An emerging scholarship: A brief history of assessment. In T. W. Banta

(Ed.), Building a scholarship of assessment (pp. 3-25). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This chapter offers a brief historical and analytical review of the assessment movement, from approximately 1985 to the present" (p.3).

Ewell, P. T. (2008).  US accreditation and the future of quality assurance: A tenth

anniversary report from the Council on Higher Education Accreditation. Washington, DC: CHEA Institute for Research and Study of Accreditation and Quality Assurance.

"This book provides a comprehensive review of the current role of accreditation in the United States and considers its future. The principal audiences for which it was prepared are policy leaders at institutions, higher education associations, accrediting organizations and government agencies."

Frye, R. (1999). Assessment, accountability, and student learning outcomes. Dialogue, (2), 1-12. Retrieved November 4, 2007, from Western Washington University, Office of Institutional Assessment and Testing website, http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/HED_COE3.pdf

This article explores the relationship between assessment, accountability and student learning outcomes. Examples of exemplary assessment programs are given as well as recommendations for improvement of student learning on college campuses.

Lee, W. (Ed.). (2010). Assessment & evaluation in higher education. ASHE Reader Series.

"This reader addresses issues and concepts regarding assessment and evaluation in higher education. The volume is intended to also serve as an instructional tool for both formal classroom settings and for self-directed learning. The content of Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education reflects a cross-section of postsecondary education by presenting reading on assessment and evaluation at public, private, coed, gender-specific, minority-serving, and predominantly white institutions. Readings regarding assessment and evaluation of human capital (e.g. administrators, staff, faculty, students, and decision makers) will also be included. This reader not only points to connections between topics, it also provides a venue for reflection on the evolution of colleges and universities during the most recent past, and it serves as a telescopic lens to see into the to prepare for the future."

Maki, P. (2004). Assessing for learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

"This book offers colleges and universities a framework and tools to design an effective and collaborative assessment process appropriate for their culture and institution. It encapsulates the approach that Peggy Maki has developed and refined through the hundreds of successful workshops she has presented nationally and internationally."

Palomba, C. A., & Banta, T. W. (1999). Assessment essentials: Planning, implementing, and improving assessment in higher education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This book examines current assessment practices in higher education and offers suggestions on planning assessment programs, carrying them out, and using the results to improve academic programs. Examples from all types of institutions (community colleges, liberal arts colleges, and comprehensive, doctoral and research institutions) are used to illustrate various assessment activities."

Peterson, M.W., Augustine, C.H., Einarson, M.K., & Vaughan, D.B. (1999). Designing student assessment to strengthen institutional performance in baccalaureate institutions. Stanford University, National Center for Postsecondary Improvement: Stanford, CA.
http://www-leland.stanford.edu/group/ncpi/documents/pdfs/5-08_baccalaureate.pdf

This monograph will "provide a national profile of current student assessment practices and institutional support patterns" and compare it with similar institutions (p.1). It also provides practical advice for practitioners.

Peterson, M. W., & Einarson, M. K. (2001). What are colleges doing about student assessment? The Journal of Higher Education, 72(6), 629-669.

"The purpose of our study was to extend current understanding of how postsecondary institutions have approached, supported, and promoted undergraduate student assessment, and the institutional uses and mpacts that have been realized from these assessment efforts" (p.630). The article may be accessed through JSTOR upon login.

Terenzini, P. T. (1989). Assessment with open eyes: Pitfalls in studying student outcomes.

Journal of Higher Education, 60, 644-664.

"This article calls attention to some of those pitfalls [of assessment] and suggests, however briefly, how at least some of them might be avoided" (p. 646). The paper has a twofold purpose, "first, to identity some of the serious conceptual, measurement, organizational, and political problems likely to be encountered in the process of designing and implementing an assessment program; and second, by identifying some of the pitfalls, to help people who are involved in assessment to "do" it well" (p. 646). This article is available through JSTOR upon login.


Using Assessment

Banta, T. W. (Ed.) (2004). Hallmarks of effective outcomes assessment. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley.

"This booklet brings together the best guidance and practices from Assessment Update to illustrate time-tested principles for all aspects of assessment from planning and implementing to sustaining and improving assessment efforts over time. Useful for those new to assessment as well as experienced practitioners, it details the specific hallmarks required for the success of any assessment program--from leadership and staff development to the assessment of process as well as outcomes, ongoing communication among constituents, and more."

Banta, T. W. (2009). Demonstrating the impact of changes based on assessment findings. Assessment Update, 21(2), 3-4.

This editor's note discusses her co-authored upcoming book, Designing effective assessment: Principles and profiles of good practice. In it they interview individuals about assessment and this article provides a brief summary of findings.

Ewell, P. T. (1999). Linking performance measures to resource allocation: Exploring

unmapped terrain. Quality in Higher Education, 5(3), 191-209.

Examination of how (and whether) particular types of institutional performance measures can be beneficially used in making resource allocation decisions finds that only easily verifiable "hard" statistics should be used in classic performance funding approaches, although surveys and the use of good practices by institutions may indirectly inform longer-term resource investments.

Peterson, M. W., Augustine, C. H., Einarson, M. K., & Vaughan, D. B. (1999). Designing student assessment to strengthen institutional performance in baccalaureate institutions. Stanford University, National Center for Postsecondary Improvement: Stanford, CA.
http://www-leland.stanford.edu/group/ncpi/documents/pdfs/5-08_baccalaureate.pdf

This monograph will "provide a national profile of current student assessment practices and institutional support patterns" and compare it with similar institutions (p.1). It also provides practical advice for practitioners.

Peterson, M. W., & Einarson, M. K. (2001). What are colleges doing about student assessment? The Journal of Higher Education, 72(6), 629-669.

"The purpose of our study was to extend current understanding of how postsecondary institutions have approached, supported, and promoted undergraduate student assessment, and the institutional uses and mpacts that have been realized from these assessment efforts" (p.630). The article may be accessed through JSTOR upon login.

Provezis, S., & Jankowski, N. (2011). Presenting learning outcomes assessment results to foster use. In C. Secolsky & D. B. Denison (Eds.), Handbook on Measurement, Assessment, and Evaluation in Higher Education (Chapter 40, pp. 602-612). Routledge.

A must-read on institutional transparency and public reporting.

Seybert, J.A. (2002). Assessing student learning outcomes. New Directions for Community Colleges, No. 117.  San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"This chapter addresses assessment of student learning in general education, transfer programs, career and occupational programs, remedial and developmental courses and programs, and noncredit and continuing education offerings, as well as assessment of affective and noncognitive outcomes and the use of assessment results." The article is available at Wiley InterScience upon login.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

"The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making."


Using Learning Outcomes

Frye, R. (1999). Assessment, accountability, and student learning outcomes. Dialogue, (2), 1-12. Retrieved November 4, 2007, from Western Washington University, Office of Institutional Assessment and Testing website, http://snipurl.com/1te85

Miller, R. (2007). Assessment in cycles of improvement: Faculty designs for essential learning outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

This publication features a series of reports on how selected colleges and universities foster and assess student learning in twelve liberal education outcome areas, including writing, quantitative literacy, critical thinking, ethics, intercultural knowledge, and information literacy. Moving from goals to experiences, assessments, and improvements driven by assessment data, each institutional story illustrates how complex learning can be shaped over time and across programs to bring students to higher levels of achievement of these important outcomes.

Otis, Megan M.(2010) 'Listening to Students', Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 42: 3, 51

An insightful article from Change magazine discussing assessment from a student's perspective. View it for free for a limited time on our website.



Complete list of resources


Association of American Colleges and Universities (2008). Our students' best work: A framework for accountability worthy of our mission (2nd Ed.). Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. http://www.aacu.org/publications/pdfs/StudentsBestreport.pdf

Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2007). Rising to the challenge: Meaningful assessment of student learning (Project Overview). Retrieved November 7, 2007, from http://snipurl.com/1te7u

Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2002). Greater expectations: A new vision for learning as the nation goes to college. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from: http://www.aacu.org/gex/index.cfm.

American Association for Higher Education. (1992). Assessment principles of good practices. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

For the following work by Banta et al., see the Wiley Online Library:

Banta, T.W. (Ed.) (1999). Portfolio assessment: Uses, cases, scoring, and impact. Jossey- Bass: San Francisco.

Banta, T.W. (Ed.) (2004). Hallmarks of effective outcomes assessment. San Francisco: John Wiley.

Banta, T.W. (2005). What draw campus leaders to embrace outcomes assessment?
Assessment Update, 17(5), 14-15.

Banta, T.W. (2009). Demonstrating the impact of changes based on assessment findings. Assessment Update, 21(2), 3-4.

Banta, T.W., & Associates. (2002). Building a scholarship of assessment. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Banta, T. W., Jones, E. A., & Black, K. E. (2009). Designing effective assessment: Principles and profiles of good practice. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Banta, T.W., & Palumbo, C.A (1999). Assessment essentials: Planning, implementing, and improving assessment in higher education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

Bollag, B. (2006). Making an art form of assessment. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 53(10), A8- A10. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from MasterFILE Premier database http://snipurl.com/1uwvq

Brownell, J. E. & Swaner, L. E. (2010). Five high-impact practices: Research on learning outcomes, completion, and quality. Washington DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Borden, V .M. H., & Pike, G.R. (Eds.) (2009). Assessing and accounting for student learning:

Beyond the Spellings Commission. New Directions for Institutional Research Assessment Supplement 2007. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Bresciani, M. J. (2006). Outcomes-based academic and co-curricular program review: A compilation of institutional good practices. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Cambridge, B., Cambridge, D. & Yancey, K. B. (Eds). (2009). Electronic portfolios 2.0:

Emergent research on implementation and impact. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Ewell, P. T. (1999). Linking performance measures to resource allocation: Exploring

unmapped terrain. Quality in Higher Education, 5(3), 191-209.

Ewell, P. T. (2002). An emerging scholarship: A brief history of assessment. In T.W. Banta

(Ed.), Building a scholarship of assessment (pp. 3-25). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ewell, P.T. (2008).  US accreditation and the future of quality assurance: A tenth

anniversary report from the Council on Higher Education Accreditation. Washington, DC: CHEA Institute for Research and Study of Accreditation and Quality Assurance.

Eubanks, D. (2006). The problem with standardized assessment: There are other, better ways than high-stakes testing to hold institutions accountable for making good on the promises of higher education. Retrieved November 5, 2007, from http://snipurl.com/1te81

Frye, R. (1999). Assessment, accountability, and student learning outcomes. Dialogue, (2), 1-12. Retrieved November 4, 2007, from Western Washington University, Office of Institutional Assessment and Testing website, http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/HED_COE3.pdf

Garcia, A. E., & Pacheco, J. M. (1992, March). A student outcomes model for community colleges: Measuring institutional effectiveness. Paper presented at the 1992 North Central Association of Colleges and Schools commission. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from the ERIC database, from http://snipurl.com/1te88

Hardison, C. M., & Vilamovska, A. (2009). The collegiate learning assessment: Setting         standards for performance at a college or university.  Santa Monica, CA: Rand. http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/TR663/

Huba, M. E., & Freed, J. E. (2000). Learner-centered assessment on college campuses: Shifting the focus from teaching to learning. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Kramer, G.L & R.L. Swing (Eds). (2010). Higher Education assessments: Leadership matters. Lanham,MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

McPherson, P., & Shulenburger, D. (2006, August). Toward a public universities and colleges Voluntary System of Accountability for undergraduate education (VSA): A NASULGC and AASCU discussion draft. Washington, DC: NASULGC. http://www.voluntarysystem.org/docs/background/DiscussionPaper3_Aug06.pdf

Maki, P. (2010). Coming to terms with student outcomes assessment: Faculty and administrators' journeys to integrating assessment in their work and institutional culture. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Maki, P. (2004). Assessing for learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Middaugh, M. F. (2009). Planning and assessment in higher education: Demonstrating institutional effectiveness. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Middle States Commission on Higher Education. (2003). Student learning assessment: Options and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Author.

Miller, R. (2007). Assessment in cycles of improvement: Faculty designs for essential learning outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Mislevy, R. J., Almond, R. G., & Lukas, J. F. (2003). A brief introduction to evidence-centered design. CSE Technical Report ETS Research Rep. No.RR-03-16. Los Angeles, CA: THe National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, Student Testing (CRESST), Center for Studies in Education, UCLA. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from http://www.education.umd.edu/EDMS/mislevy/papers/BriefIntroECD.pdf

National Commission on the Future of Higher Education (2006). A test of leadership: Charting the future of U.S. higher education. Washington, DC: US Department of Education. http://www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/pre-pub-report.pdf

New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability. (2012). Committing to Quality: Guidelines for Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education.

Otis, Megan M.(2010) 'Listening to Students', Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 42: 3, 51.

Palomba, C. A., & Banta, T. W. (1999). Assessment essentials: Planning, implementing, and improving assessment in higher education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Peterson, M. W., Augustine, C. H., Einarson, M. K., & Vaughan, D.B. (1999). Designing student assessment to strengthen institutional performance in baccalaureate institutions. Stanford University, National Center for Postsecondary Improvement: Stanford, CA.
http://www-leland.stanford.edu/group/ncpi/documents/pdfs/5-08_baccalaureate.pdf

Peterson, M. W., & Einarson, M. K. (2001). What are colleges doing about student assessment? The Journal of Higher Education, 72(6), 629-669.

Provezis, S., & Jankowski, N. (2011). Presenting learning outcomes assessment results to foster use. In C. Secolsky & D. B. Denison (Eds.), Handbook on Measurement, Assessment, and Evaluation in Higher Education (Chapter 40, pp. 602-612). Routledge.

Presidents' Forum of Excelsior College. (2007). Transparency by design: Principles of good practice for higher education institutions serving adults at a distance. Retrieved November 7, 2007, from http://www.wcet.wiche.edu/wcet/docs/tbd/TbD_PrinciplesofGoodPractice.pdf

Seybert, J. A. (2002). Assessing student learning outcomes. New Directions for Community Colleges, No. 117.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Shulman, L. S. (2007). Counting and recounting: Assessment and the quest for

accountability. Change, 39(1), 20-25.

Snider-Lotz, T. G. (2002). Designing an evidence-centered assessment program. Atlanta, GA: Qwiz, Inc.

State Higher Education Executive Officers. (2005). Accountability for better results: A national imperative for higher education. Denver, CO: Author.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Suskie, L. (2000, May). Fair assessment practices: Giving students equitable opportunities to demonstrate learning. AAHE Bulletin, 52(9), 7-9.

Terenzini, P. T. (1989). Assessment with open eyes: Pitfalls in studying student outcomes. Journal of Higher Education, 60, 644-664.

Walvoord, B. E. (2010). Assessment clear and simple: A practical guide for institutions, departments, and general education. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Walvoord, B. E. (2004). Assessment clear and simple: A practical guide for institutions, departments, and general education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Walvoord, B., & Anderson, V. J. (2009). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wolff, R., & Harris. O. D. (1994). Using assessment to develop a culture of evidence. In D.F.

Halpern and Associates, Changing college classrooms: New teaching and learning strategies for an increasingly complex world (pp. 271–288). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Limited time free access: Assessment in Education

Attitudes and assessment
Gordon Stobart
Editorial

Macro and micro influences on assessment practice
Jo-Anne Baird
Editorial

Students' conceptions of assessment: Links to outcomes
Gavin T. L. Brown and Gerrit H. F. Hirschfeld

A comparison of performance and attitudes in mathematics amongst the 'gifted'.
Are boys better at mathematics or do they just think they are?

Melanie Hargreaves, Matt Homer and Bronwen Swinnerton

The assessment of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and amotivation: Validity and
reliability of the Greek version of the Academic Motivation Scale

Vassilis Barkoukis, Haralambos Tsorbatzoudis and George Grouios; Georgios Sideridis

Teachers, schools and using evidence: Considerations of preparedness
Judy M. Parr and Helen S. Timperley

(Mis)appropriations of criteria and standards-referenced assessment in a
performance-based subject

Peter J. Hay and Doune Macdonald

Teachers' assessments of students' learning of mathematics
Michael A. Buhagiar and Roger Murphy

Exploring tensions in developing assessment for learning
Mary Webb and Jane Jones

Educational assessment in Canada
Louis Volante and Sonia Ben Jaafar

 

*Due to copyright regulations we cannot put up direct links to many of these articles, but they are available through many university libraries.